Dear Father in heaven, give us childlike hearts so that we may understand everything in the right way. Grant us work that bears fruit in spite of our faults and weaknesses, because we want to work with the understanding given by love. Father in heaven, you know that we are faced day and night with many difficulties and setbacks. But you see us, and you will help us so that your name may be honored, your kingdom may come, and your will may be done on earth as in heaven. Amen.

Amen to that.

#1. Last magazine of the year picked up from the printer today. First one for next year is well along the way.

#2. Rained a good part of the afternoon, but it slacked up enough to let me walk to the gym for one of the most rigorous workouts ever.

#3. Good news a few days ago: Somers reinstating support level from 2016. Will be a blessed relief.

#4. Would be hasty step, but one is tempted to jump to using the Versão fácil de ler. Have been reading the OT portion, recently released.

#5. I usually take weeks to adjust to writing the new year properly. Today I put the date down as 2018. Getting ahead of myself.

#6. An original verse: He ate our food and felt our pains and aches; / With us in our hard war he still partakes.

#7. A Bible verse: “So do not throw away your confidence, because it has great reward” Heb 10.35.

Napolean Hill wrote, “It’s easy to find fault with any job. Whatever your occupation or profession, there are always some unpleasant and mundane tasks you would rather omit. It is also easy to allow the things you dislike to dominate your thoughts and for you to overlook the fact that the things you dislike about your work are really a very small percentage of the overall job. Make it a point to find something good in your job every day. It need not be a big, important event; simply finding joy in doing one thing particularly well will suffice. Then, instead of looking forward to the end of the day, you will find yourself actually looking forward to going to work.”

The saint has it even easier. He sees his job as another place and point in time for serving the Lord. The more difficult the work climate, the more his light is needed. The joy he knows in the Lord is needed by everyone around him. He seeks opportunities to share the presence of God. His is no superficial, candied faith that sickens those around him, but a profound settledness in the Lord that draws people to him. If a slave of the first century could joyfully serve the Lord in the hardest conditions, certainly we today can see our jobs as something much more, as a channel of grace to a needy world.