Friends know I’m not a fan of the word leadership. In spite that that, Ed’s full devotional thought for today merits close reading. It hits home.

Moses was a “servant,” Numbers 11:11; Joshua 1:2,7,13,15b; Hebrews 3:5. Every Church leader is a servant. Their job is to copy the Master. The burden of guiding belongs to God. The task of following belongs to man. The Lord commissions the work, II Corinthians 5:18,19. He also provides the competence to lead, II Corinthians 3:5. Still, we can be certain, the task will be challenging. Courage will be needed. Trials will come. Decisions must be made. Discipline will be necessary. And doubt will hover nearby in all situations.

Focus question: How to urge people to follow the Lord and obey the will of God without compulsion, force, or manipulation?

Napolean Hill wrote, “It’s easy to find fault with any job. Whatever your occupation or profession, there are always some unpleasant and mundane tasks you would rather omit. It is also easy to allow the things you dislike to dominate your thoughts and for you to overlook the fact that the things you dislike about your work are really a very small percentage of the overall job. Make it a point to find something good in your job every day. It need not be a big, important event; simply finding joy in doing one thing particularly well will suffice. Then, instead of looking forward to the end of the day, you will find yourself actually looking forward to going to work.”

The saint has it even easier. He sees his job as another place and point in time for serving the Lord. The more difficult the work climate, the more his light is needed. The joy he knows in the Lord is needed by everyone around him. He seeks opportunities to share the presence of God. His is no superficial, candied faith that sickens those around him, but a profound settledness in the Lord that draws people to him. If a slave of the first century could joyfully serve the Lord in the hardest conditions, certainly we today can see our jobs as something much more, as a channel of grace to a needy world.

Either pilot or passenger. Somebody said that in life you’re one or the other. Your choice. Maybe better to say that God is the Pilot of this world, and his people are the flight attendants that serve others and seek to lead them to the Lord. So there’s a third class besides pilot or passenger, and that is the one we choose.