“There are at least five facts that all must face. We must live (Rom. 14:7); we must die (Heb. 9:27); we must be raised from the dead (John 5:28-29); we must face God in judgment (I Cor. 5:10), and we must live eternally somewhere (Matt. 25:46).” —Paul Wilmoth

“Most assuredly, Jesus does not give help to the angels (2:16). Whatever you want to say about the eternal destiny of angels and their free will and all of that, Jesus did not die for angels. Jesus did not take on the nature of angels. He did take on the nature of humanity.” —Daily Droplets

One of the most amazing thoughts of all time, that Jesus died for men, and not for angels.

True crime fascinates me, and this is a comparison that often comes to mind: to become a successful content creator you have to use Facebook, and using Facebook, especially if you’re a Christian and/or a conservative, is sort of like going to a mafia loan shark for $10,000. They’re happy to give it to you, just like Facebook will gladly give you the opportunity for your content to go viral on their massive platform. But then, if it does, they own you. You have to conform to their rules and their worldview, and jump through every hoop they put in front of you, if you want to remain a successful content creator. It’s just like a loan from a local mob guy: sure, now you’ve got $10,000 in your hand, but you’re going to pay a high price in return. You’re going to have to alter whatever needs to be altered — even your worldview — to accommodate Facebook. If you miss a payment or step out of line, you’re going to get a beating. And if they ever decide you’re too much trouble, they’ll just shoot you. Facebook has the power to kill publishers, and they do, not only based on publishing techniques, but based on worldview. Just think about that.

Adam4D

J. Ridley Stroop explained the name of his book, God’s Plan and Me. It’s a good explanation.

“God’s Plan” simply means that the plan or the teaching is God’s; that the lessons originated with him; that they partake of his nature and are divine. Certainly this is the kind of teaching that we all want. This is the very quality that makes the teaching peculiar or different. It is different from all human teachings because it comes from a different source; it is of divine origin. Paul reminds us of the fact that man had no part in providing this teaching when he asks the questions, “For who hath known the mind of the Lord? or who hath been his counsellor?” (Rom. 11:34). Since God thus provided the plan without the aid of man and has never delegated to man the privilege of injecting his own ideas into it, we should be exceedingly careful to remember that it is God’s plan and that we should treat it as such.

“Contrary to what a lot of people believe (or hope), comfort doesn’t take the pain away. Comfort slides in beside the pain, pulling up a chair so that we have something more than sorrow in our hearts. Comfort gently expands our spirits so that we can breathe again. Comfort opens our eyes so that we can see possibility again. And on those days, whether it is the next day or five years removed, on that day when grief rears its dark head again, comfort helps us remember that pain is not all there is.” —Peggy Haymes

This is a parenthetical statement of P. Pett in comments on Rom 7.4:

We must not let the work of the Holy Spirit blind us to the fact that Jesus Christ Himself and the Father also live within us. We can become too fond of splitting up the Triune God.

Most appropriate.

Much truth here:

Satan loves to trip us over little things. The reason for this is that it is generally a greater victory for him and shows that he can upset us by a shaving and knock us down with a straw. It is the old boast of the Jebusites, when they told David they could defend Jerusalem by a garrison of the blind and lame.

The little foxes spoil the vineyard. The minor irritations of life often sour our attitudes. The evil one will pull us down at once or by degrees, however he can.