God keeps us from wreckage

Don’t know the author of the quote, but I feel what he says.

“Through all of the brokenness and weariness that wears and tears on the human heart, the love of God keeps us from wreckage. The ship may rock heavy against the tide, but Hallelujah, He remains in control and we remain in Him, protected, directed, whole.” —M.H. Nichols

Along these lines, read my poem, THE LONGER ON EARTH.

A Methodist on Singing

Johnny Polk shared this in an email, Adam Clarke’s Commentary on Colossians 3:16:

“The singing which is here recommended is widely different from what is commonly used in most Christian congregations; a congeries of unmeaning sounds, associated to bundles of nonsensical, and often ridiculous, repetitions, which at once both deprave and disgrace the Church of Christ. Melody, which is allowed to be the most proper for devotional music, is now sacrificed to an exuberant harmony, which requires, not only many different kinds of voices, but different musical instruments to support it. And by these preposterous means the simplicity of the Christian worship is destroyed, and all edification totally prevented. And this kind of singing is amply proved to be very injurious to the personal piety of those employed in it; even of those who enter with a considerable share of humility and Christian meekness, how few continue to sing with GRACE in their hearts unto the Lord?”

Truth and love

Mr. Barclay, again, on the beginning of 2 John:

(i) Christian truth tells us the way in which we ought to love. Agape (Greek #26) is the word for Christian love. Agape (Greek #26) is not passion with its ebb and flow, its flicker and its flame; nor is it an easy-going and indulgent sentimentalism. And it is not an easy thing to acquire or a light thing to exercise. Agape (Greek #26) is undefeatable goodwill; it is the attitude towards others which, no matter what they do, will never feel bitterness and will always seek their highest good. There is a love which seeks to possess; there is a love which softens and enervates; there is a love which withdraws a man from the battle; there is a love which shuts its eyes to faults and to ways which end in ruin. But Christian love will always seek the highest good of others and will accept all the difficulties, all the problems and all the toil which that search involves. It is of significance that John writes in love to warn.

The Evil One has done a snow-job on us. Today, even Christians talk about their “passion.” Feeling is supposed to be the most genuine part of humanity. But it’s a lie. The most genuine part, if we may talk of such things, is the will. It is what we decide to do.