R's Commonplace Book

Tag: prayer (page 1 of 3)

Here’s one for you: A course on “Centering Prayer as Purification, Illumination, Union.”

“we will focus on how the practice of Centering Prayer serves as a doorway into a process that involves a downward movement into one’s inmost being to what’s blocking the free flow of grace and a rising movement of the influence of the Divine Indwelling within, which awakens an awareness of the immense love and goodness that is at the heart of all creation. Ultimately, this results in the transformation of our entire being.”

Does anybody understand this?! (It’s too deep for me.) And only for $79.95!

John has just been speaking about the Christian privilege of prayer; and now he goes on to single out for special attention the prayer of intercession for the brother who needs praying for. It is very significant that, when John speaks about one kind of prayer, it is not prayer for ourselves; it is prayer for others. Prayer must never be selfish;, it must never be concentrated entirely upon our own selves and our own problems and our own needs. It must be an outgoing activity. As Westcott put it: “The end of prayer is the perfection of the whole Christian body.” —Wm. Barclay

This from his commentary on 1 Jn 5.

And he also says this, which we need to hear, since our church bulletins are full of physical needs, but almost nothing of spiritual:

(i) We naturally pray for those who are ill, and we should just as naturally pray for those who are straying away from God. It should be just as natural to pray for the cure of the soul as it is to pray for the cure of the body. It may be that there is nothing greater that we can do for the man who is straying away and who is in peril of making shipwreck of his life than to commit him to the grace of God.

Amen!

A prayer site included this line by a contributor: “Lord, I give myself to fully follow You, whatever it may mean.” Perhaps she meant to say, whatever the cost, and that would be a wonderful prayer. The Lord has told us what following him means. The NT goes to great pains to explain what it means to follow Christ. To understand that, one needs to read, not guess at it in a prayer.

“There are very few people
who realise what God would make of them
if they abandoned themselves into his hands,
and let themselves be formed by his grace. (Saint Ignatius)
I ask for the grace to trust myself totally to God’s love.”

From today’s sacredspace.ie.

In today’s devotional Ed M., from his work Plow New Ground, wrote, as a part of his prayer:

“Your presence is my victory.”

Amen.

The prayer and the entire devotional was meaningful, as always.

Maybe the Lord will approve of this simplest of verses:

God listens to the smallest fear,
He notes the single falling tear,
He answers every needy call,
And loves the lowest man of all.

This one. Not many, probably. Not many Americans, anyway.

The Lord is going to get his will done. With or without our help.

I don’t know anything about Monty Python (I know, my ignorance is showing), but this is a good illustration about how many approach God in prayer. It underlines the need to know from Scripture before we pray, and the priority of hearing God in Scripture before speaking to him in prayer.

While we pray for the victims’ families and the surviving students, we recall Rom 8.28. Our heavenly Father is so powerful that he can bring good out of such evil.

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