R's Commonplace Book

Tag: death

Would you say this is a decent statement by Wm. Barclay of what John calls the “sin unto death” in 1Jn 5.16-17?

It is a fact of experience that there are two kinds of sinners. On the one hand, there is the man who may be said to sin against his will; he sins because he is swept away by passion or desire, which at the moment is too strong for him; his sin is not so much a matter of choice as of a compulsion which he is not able to resist. On the other hand, there is the man who sins deliberately, of set purpose taking his own way, although well aware that it is wrong.

Now these two men began by being the same man. It is the experience of every man that the first time that he does a wrong thing, he does it with shrinking and with fear; and, after he has done it, he feels grief and remorse and regret. But, if he allows himself again and again to flirt with temptation and to fall, on each occasion the sin becomes easier; and, if he thinks he escapes the consequences, on each occasion the self-disgust and the remorse and the regret become less and less; and in the end he reaches a state when he can sin without a tremor. It is precisely that which is the sin which is leading to death. So long as a man in his heart of hearts hates sin and hates himself for sinning, so long as he knows that he is sinning, he is never beyond repentance and, therefore, never beyond forgiveness; but once he begins to revel in sin and to make it the deliberate policy of his life, he is on the way to death, for he is on the way to a state where the idea of repentance will not, and cannot, enter his head.

The mortal sin is the state of the man who has listened to sin and refused to listen to God so often, that he loves his sin and regards it as the most profitable thing in the world.

In the moment of our awakening, there will be no sadness, no regrets, no fear, no doubts. What we felt before will have no place in the life beyond. The faithful will possess full knowledge, complete confidence, perfect love. Once through the portal, when the eyes are opened, all attention will fly to the glory of God and the victory of Christ. Any feeling of dread will fall away even as corruption is transformed into incorruption. Peace and joy and ultimate satisfaction will be ours. May we fix them firmly in mind now, so that our passage, whenever it may occur, will be one of confidence and certainty in the promise of God.

Just over 10 years ago, I preached a series of lessons on “The Dead and Dying.” I don’t recall much of it (probably the whole series has been lost in the digital world), but I found what was probably the first outline in the series, on Adam and Eve. The main points:

  1. The condition of death: disobedience, Gn 2.16. The first time the verb “command” is used in Bible (though not the first imperative, Gn 1.28).
  2. The certainty of death, Gn 2.17. (Hebrew: “dying you will die”, construction emphasizes certainty of the fact.)
  3. The companion of death: Not by chance that the creation of woman, Gn 2.18-25, follows immediately the command. Here, the woman was first in disobedience.

Might be a good series to preach around Halloween or All Souls’ Day, in cultures that celebrate such nonsense.

Oh, I did find this on Hezekiah, from the series.

“There are at least five facts that all must face. We must live (Rom. 14:7); we must die (Heb. 9:27); we must be raised from the dead (John 5:28-29); we must face God in judgment (I Cor. 5:10), and we must live eternally somewhere (Matt. 25:46).” —Paul Wilmoth

7points: Is the Pope right?

1. Some days are more productive than others. Takeaway lesson: You never know what day will turn out to be productive. Slog through and discover.

2. Some people linger for months or years before death. Still, God’s saints who value life care for them with love. We’re seeing it happen now, again.

3. Finished writing today the “52 Actions of the Disciple of Christ.” Good feeling. Now for a revision, and it’s ready for the printer. Psalm 119 book is also done; I’ve asked a professional brother in Christ for an estimate on a revision.

4. Pope decided the Lord’s prayer needs to be better translated. He doesn’t like: “Lead us not into temptation.” This is once he might be right. Brazilian versions give us, “Do not let us fall into temptation.” What do you think about the English translations?

5. Did I mention that next to me opened up a beer and burger joint, with a name that includes the F-word? It’s pasted all over the front and side, and you can’t miss it. Time to move.

6. An original item:

Itself the murky mind can barely see,
For all the layers of deep dishonesty.

7. A Bible verse, from the NLT, from—why not?— Matthew 6.13:

“And don’t let us yield to temptation, but rescue us from the evil one.”

Copyright © 2019 R's Commonplace Book

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑